CCNA – CCNP Certification – Hands-On Lab Configuring Two Cisco Routers

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Objective: In this lab you will configure a simple network to allow two routers to route packets between to remote networks. The text that is in bold is the text you need to type during the lab. Requirements:

  • Two Cisco routers with one Ethernet port and one serial port.
  • Cisco IOS 10.0 or higher
  • One PC for consoling into 192.168.1.1 with terminal emulation software
  • One serial cable
  • One Cisco rollover cable

Setup: Step 1: Physical Connections Connect the following interfaces:

  • Console: Connect your PC/terminal to the console port using a rollover cable and HyperTerminal (9600-8-N-1-no flow)
  • Ethernet: Connect Ethernet ports to a hub or a switch using a straight-through cable. Use a cross-over cable if going directly from the PC’s NIC to the Ethernet (AUI) port on the router using a transceiver.
  • Serial: If going directly between two routers, don’t forget to connect one port via the DTE cable and the other via the DCE cable.

Step 2: Boot up the routers Just say “no” to use the setup mode (setup dialogue). The setup mode will only allow you to configure the router with the basic features and not with any advanced features. If asked if you would like to terminate the auto configuration; say “yes”. Let the routers finish booting.

Step 3: Host Name and Passwords Begin your configuration with the host name and passwords. This is to remind you of what router you are configuring and now’s the time to start thinking about router security.

RouterA

router>en

router#config t Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z.

router(config)#hostname RouterA (sets the router’s name)

RouterA(config)#enable secret cisco (Sets the secret password for the router)

RouterA(config)#line vty 0 4 (there are five concurrent connections for the telnet ports coming into a Cisco 2500 router. We are setting the login password on all five of them)

RouterA(config-line)#login (This enables the router to require a login password for a telnet session to the router)

RouterA(config-line)#password cisco (this sets the login password for all 5 telnet sessions coming into the router as cisco)

RouterA(config-line)#exit

RouterA(config)#^Z (This is the key combination of control+z which takes you back to the privileged executive mode)

RouterA#

RouterB

router>en

router#config t Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z.

router(config)#hostname RouterB (sets the router’s name)

RouterB(config)#enable secret cisco (Sets the secret password for the router) RouterB(config)#line vty 0 4 (there are five concurrent connections for the telnet ports coming into a Cisco 2500 router. We are setting the login password on all five of them)

RouterB(config-line)#login (This enables the router to require a login password for a telnet session to the router)

RouterB(config-line)#password cisco (this sets the login password for all 5 telnet sessions coming into the router as cisco)

RouterB(config-line)#exit

RouterB(config)#^Z (This is the key combination of control+z which takes you back to the privileged executive mode)

FYI: Anytime you make a configuration change to a router and you come back to the privileged exec mode you need to save your changes to NVRAM. This ensures that if the router reboots, you won’t loose your changes which are in the running-config which is volatile RAM. The following command(s) saves your changes to the startup-config.

RouterA#copy running-config startup-config

or

RouterA# copy run start

or

RouterA#wr me (short for write memory)

Step 4: Adding IP Addresses Adding IP addresses, is a basic function of configuring routers. Below is an example of configuring both an Ethernet and serial interface. For serial interface with the DCE cable you will need to also add the clocking with the clockrate command. Get the IP addresses from the network diagram.

RouterA RouterA#config t Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z.

RouterA(config)#int e0

RouterA(config-if)#ip address 172.16.12.1 255.255.255.0

RouterA(config-if)# description LAN Network for

RouterA RouterA(config-if)# no shutdown

RouterA(config-if)#int s0

RouterA(config-if)#ip address 172.16.10.1 255.255.255.0 (RouterA will have the serial 0 with the DCE end of the serial cable. The other partner will have serial1 with the DTE end of the serial cable. Check the network diagram to confirm to see who has what interface)

RouterA(config-if)#clockrate 250000 (DCE interface only which is the s0 on RouterA)

RouterA(config-if)#no shutdown

RouterA(config-if)#description Network connection to RouterB

RouterB

RouterB#config t Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z.

RouterB(config)#int e0

RouterB(config-if)#ip address 172.16.11.1 255.255.255.0

RouterB(config-if)# description LAN Network for RouterB

RouterB(config-if)# no shutdown

RouterB(config-if)#int s1

RouterB(config-if)#ip address 172.16.10.2 255.255.255.0

RouterB(config-if)#no shutdown

RouterB(config-if)#description Network connection to RouterA

Once both routers are configured properly, you should be able to use the ping command and ping the interface e0 on each of the routers from the neighboring router. If you do a show ip route on both routers and do not see the directly connected interfaces in the routing table, they are either not configured or they never came up. Confirm that the IP addressing took and the interfaces came up by using the show ip int and looking at the interfaces’ status and ip address configuration. RouterA# show ip route RouterA# show ip int Do this on both routers.

Step 5a: Adding Dynamic Routing: RIP For this router to participate in a dynamic routing using a dynamic routing protocol like RIP or IGRP, you’ll need to enable a routing protocol and advertise the directly connected networks that want advertised.. We only advertise the classful network address, not the subnet mask of the network.

 

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